Little Yellow Rice Co. meets BESEA.N!

Little Yellow Rice Co. meets BESEA.N!
by Hannah Hosanee
on April, 7

Hannah Natalie Hosanee and Rob Allen of Little Yellow Rice Co; a heritage food brand and Peranakan supper club experience, chat to Viv Yau and Charley Wong of BESEA.N, a grassroots advocacy organisation created to shine a light on Britain’s East and South-East Asians. Watch the link to watch, or read the conversation below!

TRANSCRIPT

Viv Yau
Hello and welcome back to where are you from? But where are you from? I forgot the name of the podcast! This is a podcast by BESEA.N Britain’s East and Southeast Asian network. I’m your host Viv Yau. And with me is my co-host, Charley.

Charley Wong
And this is my first podcast back this season. So thanks for having me back. Glad I didn’t put you all off last time.

Viv Yau
Do you feel a bit rusty at the moment?

Charley Wong
Can you tell the way I’m stumbling over my words?

Viv Yau
I do too. You know, I feel like I’ve forgotten how to talk and the name of the podcast and everything

Charley Wong
I was about to say it was a belting start when you didn’t get the name right.

Viv Yau
Oh, well! And with us are two very special guests from the Little Yellow Rice Co. We have Hannah. Hannah, right, how do you say your surname, Hosanee?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Hosanee, like phonetic, so Ho-san-ee

Viv Yau
Hosanee

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah

Viv Yau
Hannah-Natalie Hosanee, and we also have Rob Allen.

Rob Allen
Hi!

Viv Yau
Hi! How are you both? Happy new year! How have you both been celebrating Lunar New Year?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
We haven’t really got going on it yet, I’m still a little bit sad that I’ve not been able to go back to Kent and have New Year with my mum in our favourite Chinatown restaurant in London – Imperial Garden, so small plug for them.

(Phone stars beeping)

Viv Yau
Turn that off.

Charley Wong
What is this unprofessional malarkey we’re doing here?

Viv Yau
I thought you were media trained Hannah!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
That was for my reminder to tell me that I’m doing this!

Charley Wong
Five minutes late.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
And so we haven’t really got into it. So our celebrations kind of all start from this point onwards, I think in our next kind of 16 to 14 days now countdown with events and such celebrating with your good selves with dim sum on Sunday.

Viv Yau
Yeah. Oh my gosh, I’m so excited.

Charley Wong
Yeah, well excited for that. Do you have any other traditions that you follow for the Lunar New Year?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Generally, I will have had my hair cut, my nails done, try to do a swift clean.

Viv Yau
Let’s see the nails. Oh, little tiger.

Charley Wong
Is that a tiger? Whoa.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Well, I normally go home and celebrate with my mum. And we always go to London, but still, that’s still on hold with my mum at the moment. So yeah, you guys can be my make do family, my Manchester EC family instead?

Viv Yau
Aw, I feel like there’s been quite a lot of that this year where we’re kind of making our own traditions because people haven’t been able to go back home or people usually don’t celebrate it and they’re wanting to try to make new traditions with their friends in different ways. So yeah, I’m happy we’re doing something this Sunday to celebrate.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Do you have any traditions that you want to instigate, Robert, as part of the Lunar New Year?

Rob Allen
Well obviously it’s very much new to me. And I can’t say in the past I ever celebrated it as such.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
You just want to just want to do belly pork.

Rob Allen
Yeah, for me it is very much about the food, it’s a shame that we didn’t get to do anything yesterday because I was on a 12 hour shift! So yeah, we’ve done a big Wing Yip shop this morning.

Charley Wong
Amazing.

Rob Allen
Getting ready for our events. So looking forward to that.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I did have pineapple. I have got pineapple cakes, which is a very Malaysian thing. They’re from Rumble London so I’ve had those. That’s about as far as I’ve got with being festive right now.

Charley Wong
Sounds delicious. Now talking about Malaysia. That’s kind of a segue into my next question. Who says I’m rusty at this? Where are you from? Tell us more.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
So I am of mixed heritage. So my mum is Chinese Malaysian of Peranakan descent, which is a lovely melting pot of all the people around Malaysia and all the surrounding countries. So I think that heritage is… it goes back to Hainan in China, but I suspect my grandmother because she was adopted, we think that she was a Singaporean, so we are very proud of her, and I’m mixed as my dad is from Mauritius. So I have an interesting blend of culture and cuisine that I like to embrace the food from.

Charley Wong
What about you, Rob?

Rob Allen
Not quite as exciting, really.

Viv Yau
Rob is white, by the way. If anyone was wondering.

Rob Allen
Definitely not Peranakan. I was born in the East Midlands, Wolverhampton.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
That’s West Midlands.

Rob Allen
This is how much detachment I have to my own heritage! I don’t even remember it.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
There’s a lot of heritage in the Black Country.

Viv Yau
There is – the triple cooked chips is a thing, apparently, isn’t it in Wolverhampton?

Rob Allen
Black pudding…

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Pork as well

Charley Wong
Black pudding? Yeah, you can’t claim black pudding, that’s all we’ve got going for us in the North.

Viv Yau
It’s kicking off.

Rob Allen
So yeah, I always say to people, I don’t really feel like I’m from anywhere. Because I’ve never lived in like one place long enough to grow into it.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
That’s a separate podcast.

Viv Yau
You’re a child of the world.

Rob Allen
So yeah, more. And I think that just means that it’s made me a lot more receptive and open to other cultures and traditions and sort of being open-minded.

Viv Yau
Do you know anything about your ancestry? Rob, like, where your family came from?

Rob Allen
Not a huge amount. I think as far back as I remember, we’re just, you know, very much white British. My surname is Allen. A-L-L-E-N. And so I’m guessing there’s probably some Celtic, Scottish or Irish ancestry, and then my granddad was Polish. So I’ve got some Eastern European heritage as well.

Charley Wong
There we go.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
So we did try and embrace your Polish heritage and I took you to Poland.

Rob Allen
Just embarrassed me because I didn’t know any of the language!

Charley Wong
We’re very inclusive here though, Rob, you don’t have to speak the language to embrace the culture.

Rob Allen
But they speak better English than I do. Most of the time.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I think that was an unfortunate position because we went to see my best friends that are both very strong women, but that wasn’t a great introduction to Poland with them asking you why don’t you know more about your Polish heritage!

Viv Yau
Ah, that is like a very triggering question, though, I think for people who don’t know the language of their ancestry. So, yeah, yeah, it’s okay. Well, we got you, we got you.

Rob Allen
Thanks.

Viv Yau
So tell us about yourselves then like that. Let listeners know a bit about yourself, paint a picture, and I’d like to focus on the fact that you both love going to raves and partying quite a lot. Please tell us about that. And then also later on, tell us about Little Yellow Rice Co as well!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
So, Robert and I met through food when I was consulting, Rob was in the kitchen, and Rob shouted across the kitchen. ‘Oh, I follow you on Instagram, you’ve just come back from Ibiza!’. And so that’s when we realised we’re kindred spirits. And that’s definitely like the two things that we have in common; all our love of kind of music and food, and I think we’re very, we’re in a fortunate position that we can still go out and enjoy music. And that’s definitely my outlet, well it’s definitely our outlet, is to still go out and enjoy good music, meet interesting people, and kind of live in a city where there’s great venues, but we are a little bit picky, you know, and where we go now, because you’re getting a little bit older, to middle age, you can’t really go to a student night, it’s a little bit frowned on!

Viv Yau
It’s a bit creepy

Rob Allen
I have to stop her, and say no, we can’t go to that one. We’ll just be surrounded by children!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah. When you love UK Garage you know, a lot of those nights are very much younger.

Viv Yau
So so just going back to how did Rob end up following you on Instagram like, and then like how, like, how did you find each other?

Rob Allen
Well, I started working for a new startup business in Leeds called Lean Lunch, which the sort of concept behind it was to provide sort of convenient, healthy, nutritious meals to office workers in town, they’d order online and then as it was independent it then get delivered by us like to them for their lunchtime so yeah, I was helping start that up and develop all the menu and sort the kitchen out, and because it was a startup they wanted marketing help. So that was where you got involved, isn’t it? And I think I just saw because I was following like, Lean Lunch on Instagram. I think they reshared something about one of the meals you’ve received.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Just tell it how it is! You were going through the likes on the business account and you saw me, and you just started following me!

Viv Yau
And you were like, I want a bit of that!

Charley Wong
Why?! Why didn’t you slide into the Instagram DMs? Why? Why did you decide that shouting across the kitchen was the way to go?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
There was a little bit of confusion on the DMs to be honest, Charlie. So Robert did send me a DM but I had misunderstood it because-

Charley Wong
Did you ego his DM?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Did I what?

Charley Wong
Ego his DM, like ignore his DM. Sorry that’s a Gen Z thing, I think I’m jumping!

Viv Yau
Ego?

Charley Wong
If you ego someone you’re ignoring them.

Viv Yau
like E-G-O, ego?

Charley Wong
Yeah

Viv Yau
All right cool. Never heard that before!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
No, he sent me a DM to say that we should go networking but being you know, a businesswoman…

Rob Allen
I said networking in…

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Bunny ears.

Rob Allen
Inverted commas.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
But I thought he actually –

Viv Yau
Did you use the bunny emoji? You thought you were gonna take her bunny networking conference where there are lots of rabbits there?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Which you know, you know, I love my rabbits. So I legitimately thought he wanted to go networking. So I said, let’s go to these digital drinks. I didn’t realise that it was like an actual invitation to go out on a date or something. So there was a little bit of confusion with the DMs.

Viv Yau
So that, but that wasn’t your first date, though. Or was that your first date going to a networking event together?

Rob Allen
No, I think the first wasn’t really a date. We just sort of like one night we’re just like messaging like what are you up to, and I just happened to be in a nightclub in Leeds and Hannah was in the bar opposite. So I was just like, oh, yeah, this night I’m at is not very good, I’ll just go and meet you.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
So we just met in the middle of the street outside.

Viv Yau
That’s so romantic.

Charley Wong
So romantic, slash a little bit creepy on Rob’s part. Oh, look at that. I’m just conveniently right next to where you are.

Viv Yau
How convenient.

Rob Allen
Leeds is a really small place!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
And it was an event where he didn’t have a coat. So I was already thinking that’s a red flag!

Viv Yau
You were like, great, what we’re gonna do with this one?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah!

Viv Yau
And how many years has it been since then?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Four and half?

Rob Allen
Four and a quarter?

Viv Yau
Rob knows exactly when – ‘and three days and 24 hours and six minutes.’

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I know, a lot of people assume that we must have been together much longer. But I think when you’re a bit older, you just, your kind of relationships mature a bit faster. I don’t know.

Viv Yau
They do, actually. Yeah.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Maybe because we basically worked together for three of those four years and lived together and had lockdown, twenty-four hours together!

Viv Yau
Wow. Yeah. I mean that’s make or break all of those. All of the above is make or break. So we’d love to hear more about Little Yellow Rice Co and the fact that you are both co-founders of Little Yellow Rice Co, can you tell us about the brand, why you started everything, the whole origin story, please Marvel style go!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I’ll talk about the origin, and then Robert can talk about how he’s very particular with the food. So Little Yellow Rice Co is something I had on my mind for about 10 years before I did it. It’s basically a heritage brand that is a tribute to my family. So the Ooi Klan, our name roughly translates to yellow, so that’s why it’s Little Yellow Rice Co and I really just wanted to kind of give Peranakan and Nyonya food a bit of visibility because I could kind of see that dying out. Like all my own cousins and family there don’t really celebrate Nyonya food or they’re more interested in kind of buying the Western… like they love pizza, they love Italian food and they don’t really go like hunting for all those street hawker stores, you know that and I felt like a little bit that knowledge is disappearing. So I wanted to make sure that for the next generation they kind of are aware of our heritage, where we came from. My great-granddad came from Hainan and left our ancestral clan house, that’s still there, with his first wife and his oldest daughter, and went to Malaysia and set up a coffee shop. So I think I’m the next person along in the family other than that coffee shop to have continued our food heritage kind of lineage sort of thing. And everything around Little Yellow Rice Co is a nod back to being grateful for him making that migration to Malaysia, setting up a business, having 10 children – my granddad being the oldest. There is a framed photo of my great-grandpa, which not weird. It’s fine. It’s lovely. It’s a lovely, lovely nostalgic touch. Yeah, so it’s kind of all about them. And it’s about the time I spent kind of growing up in Malaysia, I was really fortunate to live in Malaysia from kind of being 18 months old to five. So I got to experience all of the kind of all my formative kind of growing up years with the food, the culture, my family, both my grandparents bringing me up. My mum was around but she really just left me out as my granddad’s shadow. So all of this is very much a nostalgic brand and when people come in, they hear the story and they eat the food, I think all our kind of like fellow Chinese Malaysians kind of relate to their Ah ma and Ah kong, kind of what it was like in the stores and stuff. So it’s very much a brand that’s rooted in our specific Nyonya Peranakan heritage. And I was very fortunate along the way when I met Rob that was kind of the catalyst to like – okay, let’s take it for more story to actually do the food. And that’s when we went to Malaysia because I needed Rob to experience it, to experience the kind of nuances with that kind of Chinese Malaysian food to what you had in the UK. And that’s when I took you to Malaysia and then you can continue about your love for Malaysian food!

Rob Allen
Yeah, it was quite strange for me because to be honest, like before, about my background in catering and cooking is very much European and Western because obviously it sort of has to be, and it’s only through this that I’ve just started to, you know, basically I’m learning. This is the very beginning of my journey into East Asian cuisine but I think it’s sort of just worked out really well because you wanted to do this food thing. I always remember like when I first started seeing her, she kept going on about she wanted to open a small place, that one of her dreams – was to open a small place; doing chicken rice. Which at the time, I actually had like no idea what that was!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I did actually make you chicken rice.

Rob Allen
Until, yeah, one night I came around and she was like, “I’m gonna make chicken rice” and made it in there, got the little rice cooker out, and got the paste and like put it on the some of the chicken on the rice and then…

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Don’t tell people that was paste, I made that from scratch!

Rob Allen
Hannah used chicken rice paste and then yeah, just steamed chicken over…

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I showed you how to use the rice cooker so that was the first revelation.

Rob Allen
Yeah, before that I had been like an absolute idiot trying to cook rice in a pan, and now I go around to all other people that don’t have a rice cooker like ‘Oh you absolute losers!’

Charley Wong
You’ve seen the light with a rice cooker owner.

Rob Allen
Yeah she cooked that for me and it was so simple. Wow, this is really good.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Then I just made this better.

Rob Allen
I think like it was more of my sort of my extra know-how… not knowing about Chinese and Malaysian food but knowing sort of how things could be scaled and sort of logistics and stuff. So then that coming together with Hannah’s food knowledge and what she wanted to do. It just sort of like came together and now yeah, it’s great for me because I like Asia, Asia and East Asian foods, Southeast Asian food is I think is the best in the world and it’s my favourite!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Thanks, it’s very broad, isn’t it?

Rob Allen
Now I just have this like privilege to be able to like in sort of indulge my love of it. Whereas before I really don’t think, you know, that would have ever happened without you wanting to start this thing, yeah.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I think also there was a big change, the big turning point was actually going to Malaysia. It might like, we all know like the version of food you cook, this kind of food is your mom’s version. You know, your family version. So when I took Rob to Malaysia, he, he had like a real preference for like Malay food, which is a little bit like I didn’t like our family just eat like classic Nyonya foods. So I actually got to experience a little bit of like a tourist version when I went with Rob because he wants to go look at all these places, that as a family we only eat in the same places. I think they were just fascinated to see Rob, just inhale every single thing for two weeks. We know that he loves spicy. Always like, the most spicy food!

Rob Allen
Yeah, I just didn’t stop eating basically! I’ve never experienced anything like that in my life. Because it’s such a much nicer, sort of communal food culture. They seem to be eating out all the time, with each other. So just like, you just felt like eating all the time, and yeah, that’s what we did basically!

Viv Yau
That’s amazing, and tell us a bit about where Little Yellow Rice Co is now. I loved hearing that story because it just seemed like such a natural coming together of like both Hannah, your heritage and Rob with your expertise being a chef. So where is little yellow rice who now then like for those who haven’t heard of you as a company before, it’s a brand, what do you sell? Where do you sell, where are you?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
So we are now based out of Manchester – we were in Leeds before, we moved during the pandemic, which was fun! But we predominately do supper clubs. So we do an experience based dinner where it’s a set menu and people come and I tell the story about Little Yellow Rice Co and really just to kind of make people aware about the nuances with like, Southeast Asian food, you know that I really hate it when people say I like Chinese food because it’s a massive place you know, so I’m kind of doing my little bit of story and awareness in what we do. And then we’ll provide each of the dishes, it will have a little bit of information as well, about where that dish came from. Because with Malaysia, the food like has so many different origins you know, it’s a classic Malaysian dish but it’ll have elements of Thai or have elements of like Filipino food etc. So it’s more of an experience, I think most people that come are ready for the full course meal, five-course meal, but then they don’t expect me to be kind of talking for an hour and a half, which is an added bonus obviously! I get all my trinkets out and all the batik cloths I’ve brought back from Malaysia, we laboriously brought back all the cutlery and crockery so when you sit down you feel like you could be at a hawker stall. So we’re doing supper clubs across Leeds, Manchester, Sheffield, London. And we also then had to pivot during lockdown and have a shop that we sell our chilli sauces which is more kind of Rob’s labour of love because we found out that I’m highly allergic to chilli fumes Rob makes the chilli! I think that’s his now labour of love, is to make each batch, in his eyes, better than the last batch.

Rob Allen
I think that goes with all the food though. I think for most chefs or good chefs, and good cooks, you’re never happy with what you’ve done. There’s always like you finish it and you have this thought of like… I don’t know how to like explain it, you sort of like beat yourself up about it. You never… well, for me anyway, never fully like content. There’s always like, I could have done that, or next time I’ll do this.

Charley Wong
How have you found, obviously being the chef part with the cooking expertise that you bring to Little Yellow Rice Co? How have you found the reception from the eastern Southeast Asian community? Obviously, you know, like you say, with the privilege of being a white man cooking this food – have you found the reception of them welcoming? Obviously, I mean for me, I see you as like the conduit to Hannah’s you know knowledge of the culture etc and you’re putting those things into practice and kind of delivering it on a plate. You know what I mean?

Rob Allen
I totally agree with that.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
It’s such a nice way of putting it as well.

Viv Yau
Rob is the conduit.

Rob Allen
With this food, it’s not my cooking. Well, obviously it is, but the reason I’m doing it, knowing that ultimately it’s not for me, and I’m trying to make it as close as possible as how it’s commonly known and experienced and how you remember it. When I’m looking for, like, when we’re doing a new recipe. I’ll go through like multiple recipes on the internet, and try and find the sort of, like, the common factors and techniques until I can come to a formulation like okay, I’m gonna do it this way. And then Hannah will try it and I’ll be like, oh, is that right? You know, is that right? Some sometimes she’s like, fine, it’s like, yeah, that’s yeah, that’s good. And other times, she’ll just be like, no, that’s too spicy!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Or it’s always more ginger. Always more!

Viv Yau
Don’t be shy on the ginger Rob! Yeah, I think it brings like us to that wider discussion around gatekeeping, and who can cook food from like culture, that a culture that isn’t theirs? Because, you know, it’s not like you’re front-facing and you’re not trying to reinvent anything like everything is so well researched. And obviously Hannah and your story you’re the face of everything that you do with Little Yellow Rice Co, I think people see an issue with it when white people are trying to reinvent and change something and kind of like make it better in the western gaze, which is not the case at all, I don’t think.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah, I think the thing is with what we’re doing is we’re not inventing anything. We’re very clear, like nothing. None of these recipes are new. The whole point of it is it’s a heritage brand. And it’s first and foremost about going back and elevating some of those forgotten dishes. And there’s nothing I love more than when my mum will come out with a gem, like the Jiu hu cha. And then we made it and we posted and people went oh my god, I’ve not seen that for so long. I haven’t seen that dish. I thought that dish was forgotten. And I get other Penangites like Kit Eats and when he praises it, you know, oh such good food. When we had someone that came to the Malaysia games, and they hadn’t had the Hong bak. The last time I had this my grandma made it and made little YouTube video for it and post. It was like just the video of him like eating and like it’s so delicious. I haven’t had this since my grandma in Malaysia. This is why we do it, so it’s definitely not reinventing anything, and when people come and we get like the aunties come – like, there was one Auntie, she was like going through all of our pots! I never take credit for it because I don’t do the technical cooking on that side, so I directed her to Rob, she was so impressed. Like, okay, he knows what this is, he’s using the right ingredients, and he can tell which store to go and buy it from in Manchester.

Rob Allen
Yeah, that’s the best sort of feedback and praise you can get is from people that properly know the food. And when they say it’s good, that’s basically all I’m looking for. I’m not trying to please everyone.

Charley Wong
Well, you got the Papa Wong seal of approval!

Rob Allen
I was going to say, I think probably that that probably is like the one that I think of most, of you saying your dad loved it. Sometimes it’s like, “that tastes like the one my dad would cook”. Yeah, yeah, it’s really nice praise. It also makes me feel a bit like I don’t know…not awkward, but sort of, like sort of imposter syndrome feeling. I think it’s like, I don’t really deserve to be cooking the food. I don’t know, it’s pretty, it’s a bit of a difficult one. But also there’s a bit of like, selfishness that I love this food. And I really enjoy cooking it. And I now can, and I can feel not guilty and enjoy it.

Charley Wong
But you kind of respect the privilege to be able to cook this food and learn about this food, you know, and I think that’s really important.

Rob Allen
I just always remember that I don’t actually know anything about it really. Ultimately, I don’t know anything about this food. I’m always learning and just always listening, listening to feedback. And yeah, like, when we did a supper club at Hackney Chinese. I was sort of confronted with this proper traditional Chinese kitchen which a range of wok burners. I was honestly I was absolutely shocked!

Viv Yau
Scary. That’s intimidating as f*ck.

Rob Allen
I was just like, oh, like how am I gonna do this!? Luckily, Celestial Peach, Jenny, enlisted some kitchen assistance for me; her mate Jia and I was like ‘Oh that’s good, I have got some assistance’, but it wasn’t actually just the assistance, it was so useful because he knew so much more than me about all the food and recipes and stuff, that I was there in the kitchen like basically learning from him, even though he’s not a chef or a cook. He does a lot of cooking in his own time, but..

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
He actually works in tech infrastructure

Rob Allen
it was really good to be with someone that says ‘Yeah, no, it’s never been like that. You know? This is my food this is how I do it’.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
That was a really intimidating event as well because I’d say like the majority of our events the attendees are of EC heritage but the majority of that event were actual Chinese Malaysians. And, also, there was like the people in the kitchen, the guys are actually Chinese. They are like old Chinese uncles that used to serve at the same dim sum restaurant, like the place, I’ve been eating that since I was four! I was like speaking to the guy and I was like, oh my god you used to work in that restaurant. I’ve eaten there since I was four – so I was a little bit starstruck by this guy at the Hackney Chinese place. I went to ring my mum like you know that Yum Cha we used to eat at? Yeah, this guy worked there, and she was like “what are you talking about?”

Charley Wong
I think that’s amazing though. I think with any expert or with any person who specialises in something, you never see yourself as an expert, you can kind of see yourself as a student who’s always learning and I think that’s a really brilliant place to start like you said, you know, there’s so much about Peranakan food, there’s so much to explore and this is only from one perspective and there’s so many other rich and multicultural perspectives that haven’t been explored yet. So I think it’s like a really really really grounding position to be in where you’re not trying to, I guess, position yourself as the expert of all Asian foods for example, which we have seen – we have seen people do that. So I really think it’s amazing, and your food is incredible as well!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I think that’s like such a big thing for us as well, like we made a dish and we put it on our Instagram account and someone said oh, “why didn’t you serve it with your own chilli sauce?” Because we’re not crazy Lao gan ma is the best chilli sauce so we’re not gonna find a flavour better than Lao gan ma!

Charley Wong
Who would do that? Who would claim their chilli sauce is better than Lao gan ma?

Rob Allen
You know, this isn’t about us. This isn’t about selling, it’s not about like… I just want to share this recipe and this food. There’s no ego or like…

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
That is one of the critiques we actually got from some of our peers, it was ‘Oh, why don’t you charge more?’ I think someone else was saying ‘you need to charge this for tickets, that for tickets’. But we don’t go it from that kind of commercial perspective. We do it because we want it to be accessible, and the whole point is I want more people to eat it, so they go away and say ‘Oh, I had this really good nostalgic Malaysian food, or, oh I tried Malaysian food for the first time, oh it’s actual Malaysian food, it’s Peranakan and it’s Nonya’ and have more of an understanding of like the diversity in that country. We would probably like to not sell online but people keep asking for the chilli sauce and now we’re stuck, we have to keep making it!

Charley Wong
Sorry guys it’s all my fault. I keep buying the chilli! I haven’t had some for a while and I need to get back on that. How do you ensure, Hannah, that the food you are creating, yourself and Rob – How do you ensure that it is close to what you ate at home? You know, what are your benchmarks for it? Because food is so personal you know, and you’ll have so many things, like you say, everyone thinks that the best food they eat is their family’s version of whatever it might be. How do you kind of ensure that you are getting what that was, how can you remember? Because, you know, like you said, you grew up to the age of five, you know, did you grow up eating it past that age? If I tried to recreate anything that my dad makes, I’m not even sure I’d know where to start to be honest.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I have like a really privileged upbringing of being able to go back to Malaysia every, every other year. And I do that now. And we get a lot of feedback, like really positive feedback from our family, like my auntie Maggie will tell us like what tools to use for this, she was the one that showed us that little stabby device that you need to make good siu yuk, so it’s good and crispy!

Charley Wong
I know exactly what stabby device you’re talking about as well, because my dad has one.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I think we’re just to the point of like, again, you know, where we lose money, we’re painstaking on making sure that we, like Rob, will get the right ingredients, that we will find the recipe and then I will get the recipe from like my cousins or my Auntie’s, and we’ll painstakingly try and find out what that ingredient is because obviously, they have loads of different things, which has been half the fun of it is like, I call it one thing in Hokkien and then Rob is looking it up, and it’s actually in Mandarin, or Cantonese, or something completely different. It’s like, hang on, this is the same thing as that thing is, I think it’s you know, we don’t cut corners, we will spend that time looking for that item. We’ve got really good suppliers, sometimes we have to bring the stuff in. Like sometimes we get it imported in from Malaysia, and then we realise, oh, this is the same nut that we could get in the supermarket! But it’s just not cutting corners, you know, you have to just do that work to make sure that you’re delivering the same thing. And we get plenty of feedback. You know, that’s the nature of these kind of audiences, everyone is very straight-talking. People will tell us: ‘That’s not right. That’s not right.’ There’s no front. Oh, no, someone didn’t like our food, that’s fine. We have to keep mixing up and making it improve. Within reason though, because, you know, it’s not going to taste like everybody’s mums. We know we’re not that good! But I think yes, it is about you know, it’s probably different to a lot of other food businesses. It’s a heritage brand, it’s about making it so people carry on, we need to find out what those particular ingredients are and translate that so that other people can also start having a go at making the food, and in their own homes and doing it but it just takes a long time. You know, we spent a good year before we launched the business just refining dishes. Like we didn’t go out and like we’re just like crack on and like put food out. We spent like so long. So the stuff for me anyway, is still not finished. I think our friends ate so much chicken rice! Like…

Charley Wong
Is there too much chicken rice though? Because I don’t think there’s too much chicken rice!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
For me, never! There’s never too much chicken rice.

Charley Wong
I think it’s really funny as well how you talk about ingredients, reminded me of this weekend, I made some lo bak go with my dad for Lunar New Year. And he was like, “this is a very expensive lo bak go”, and I was like, “What do you mean, it’s just like, you know, mooli, lap cheong, that kind of thing”. He was like, “I had to import these. The shrimps from from Hong Kong, my friend had to send them by UPS”. I was like “there’s fried shrimp every where!”, he’s like, “No, it needs to be these ones!”.

Viv Yau
It’s such an Asian parent reflex, isn’t it? Like my mom always has to mention, these are really expensive. I got them sent to me all the way from Hong Kong and like, have to like express it so many times, like, let you know how much it’s worth.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I can’t get my head around, like why my mum has curry leaves wrapped in a newspaper in the freezer, that she brought back from Sri Lanka, when you can buy that in the normal supermarket.

Charley Wong
It’s not the same Hannah, not the same! And kind of going off that, obviously, you know, you now have come to appreciate the Southeast Asian cuisine. And you know, I would say that well, you just said that’s where your passion lies. Now, obviously, you were kind of the french trained chef, is that how you would describe it? Before this, Rob? How’s your experience been, kind of, in the chef world and kind of transitioning from being a traditionally trained chef to, you know, someone who is embodying cultural heritage and like you say, constantly learning and, you know, maybe not being the expert expert, but…

Rob Allen
I think it’s that’s quite difficult because before I’ve not actually worked for anyone doing East Asian cuisine. You know, I’m sort of building this and learning on my own and haven’t really worked in a professional environment, doing East Asian cuisine. So yeah, that’s quite a difficult question. I think it’s hard to compare what it’d be like in the professional working world. But I think for me, it feels a lot more natural. Obviously, because I enjoy the food a lot more, but I think just, as I’m learning and the techniques and everything, it just feels so much more natural, more like intuitive to me and how I cook.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
That’s not to say you still don’t go on about French cooking.

Rob Allen
Yeah, I think I just love being able to do this. Without yeah, like I said before, without the sort of, maybe the guilt and anxiety I would have had before. Because Hannah would tell you that I’m quite an anxious and overthinking person at times. So to be doing something like this, which would have been really, really difficult in any other circumstance, I would have had like, a huge amount of like, self-doubt, and things like that.

Charley Wong
So what I’ve just heard there is Hannah has brought out the best version of you.

Viv Yau
The way Hannah was just looking at Rob was so sweet! Like the sweetest I’ve ever seen you look Hannah. You’re saying with your eyes, you say it with your eyes.

Rob Allen
Hannah’s just thinking of all the food that she gets to eat!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I never say you’re too anxious, I always say you’re an anxious being, I always make it far more jovial.

Viv Yau
I think it’s very good to be able to admit that, especially as a man to be able to talk about like mental health and, and things like that. It’s a very, very brave thing to be able to do.

Rob Allen
Yeah. Which in fact, it makes me like sort of struggle to understand how a lot of other… maybe people… not a similar situation, but certain brands and food businesses, I won’t name any names, but it just like, it just stresses me out how they are just so like, they just go into it. Sort of blasé and like, I’m doing this. For instance, saying, oh, this is traditional Chinese buns, when they’re doing open bao, which is like Taiwanese in origin and then saying that their branding is based on the fact that they watched Kung Fu Panda or something. A lot of instances where they’re just like, in like, in recent years doing East Asian food, I think now it’s getting more and more sort of trendy in a way. Sort of like a hipster pastime to be like I’m into Ramen. I mean, I’m doing a Thai pop up or something. And it’s just like, but why? Like, what’s the story?!

Viv Yau
That’s what I always wonder, like, why? Why are you focusing on this so much?

Rob Allen
For me, it’s so like, I can’t detach it from history, because food is people’s history and identity. And it’s not really something just to be like, pissed around with, but…

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
It’s a difficult one because a lot of the food or is very symbolic and has meaning of why it’s eaten at certain times, and why those ingredients are used.

Rob Allen
I think there’s certain foods where you can probably you know, pretty much get away with like, oh, it doesn’t really matter what… a burger or something, which has very, like vague origins but when people are taking whole sort of like, cultures and regional food and just doing it for the fun of it. That I struggle to understand how people can do that without questioning, and like having anxiety about it.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I don’t agree with the gatekeeping of it, and I’m never disparaging on people that are like ‘I really enjoy that food and make it – I’m going to try and learn and kind of recreate that food.’ I think that that has become an issue over the past couple years as well, the gatekeeping of it. I would never, I would never be disparaging on people that sell, you know, have got no affiliation to that food, you know?

Rob Allen
It’s about the context isn’t it? About, you know, what they’re doing and why they’re doing it. If someone is doing, you know, regional food from another culture, and they’re just, you know, they’re really knowledgeable about it, and they actually, you know, they’re not saying something is what is isn’t, not twisting it, and then still saying it, that this is traditional. And, you know, it’s, it’s actually fine to, like, I think even take a certain food and say that you’re inspired from it, and then saying, I’m inspired by this, and this is, you know, my twist, and as long as you’re saying, right, this isn’t that thing, and I’m not doing that.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
They would never get away with doing that, my mum would absolutely be on top of it!

Viv Yau
Auntie would be raining down on them! When I see people saying, for example, a white person cooking food that isn’t theirs, like, there is that initial curiosity, oh I wonder why? And then I think everything around that, like you said, like the context, the respect for the culture, the acknowledgement that this is not their culture, and they are inspired by it. I think all of that, like makes such a difference if you’re going to, like, I don’t know, use that brand or buy from that brand. But yeah, I think we could talk about this for ages. I wanted to ask actually because we had for East and Southeast Asian heritage month last year, you both put on an amazing event, the Congee club event in Manchester, which was so good. And I think Charlie mentioned earlier that your dad came along and loved it. And the congee was amazing. And we wanted to ask, what are your congee tips or what’s your recipe for it? How did you make it so good? Because I can’t recreate it myself at home to be that smooth.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Are you sure? You just put more cheese on.

Viv Yau
It still doesn’t like, it still doesn’t like cover the fact that the rice isn’t right, it never breaks down properly, you know?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
That’s because you’re very particular aren’t you, Rob, on how you make your rice?

Charley Wong
How do you do it?

Rob Allen
Just keep cooking it.

Charley Wong
Now there must be more to that.

Rob Allen
You made congee for me the first time.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I wouldn’t know, I was probably just guided by my rice.

Rob Allen
Yeah, obviously I’ve just eaten it out quite a few times and then did my own search. But yeah, I use Jasmine rice. We use raw rice and then what I do is soak it first for about half an hour and then drain that water off and then put that rice into the freezer.

Viv Yau
It takes f*cking ages. I want it now.

Rob Allen
It just sort of shortens the cooking time though. So when you put it in the freezer, the water that’s gone into the rice, the freeze sort of like expands and start breaking the rice down. So that when you then go to start boiling it which if I can remember I think is about one one part rice to eight parts water. It will just cook a lot more quickly and you’ll get a sort of smoother finish if that’s what you want, because some people prefer congee with a little bit more bite.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
This is the issue, like Rob’s cooking ability for like East Asian food has exceeded mine because you spend so much time reading like Aunties’ blogs. I’m like I just want to cook my dinner in 30 minutes and have it prepped whereas, you know, Rob will have spent like a half-day reading multiple sources of like, ‘oh, you can put it in the freezer’ – I know I’m not doing that!

Viv Yau
I’m not doing that. that is the most comprehensive congee recipe I’ve heard because we all try to ask our parents but I asked my mom she’s just like just add rice with water. And I’m like…

Rob Allen
That’s right!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
No, because you put it in the freezer and you didn’t have…

Viv Yau
You’re doing the whole soaky-soaky thing, one part of this, eight part of that!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah, that’s the unfair bit, it’s because he’s a chef. He now has the cool know-how, he can work out like the ingredient – Well, if you put that on the hob it will break… I wouldn’t know that.

Viv Yau
I wouldn’t know to break down, I’d be like why are you doing that? It’s just gonna take up freezing space and you’re late. The congee at Chef Dao on Sunday was f*cking banging. It’s so good, you know.

Rob Allen
I’ll have to get some of that!

Charley Wong
It’s gonna be better than Rob’s congee.

Viv Yau
I have to say is the best congee I’ve had in such a long time.

Rob Allen
The best congee I had recently was when we went to the Things Palace pop up.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Lorkan’s Things Palace.

Viv Yau
Is that in London?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
No, it was at Mackie Mayor, and he put… what’s that mushroom? Golden? Lion? Golden Lion mushroom? The one where it looks like a mane.

Charley Wong
Alright, oyster mushroom almost?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
It looks like a lion’s mane because it’s got like…

Rob Allen
It’s more delicate

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah, that was – it was like very creamy, he got it very salty.

Rob Allen
That congee was so tasty. It was just like the best one I’ve ever had.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Shame he moved to Australia, he was also of Malaysian – Malacca, they do good rice in Malacca. They know what they’re doing.

Rob Allen
And everything like that. And just learn the best techniques and ways to do it. I just this morning I was like, watching like, I think I watched about four or five YouTube videos on like how to like, portion up a whole poached chicken.

Viv Yau
Just get a meat cleaver and go – Ah! Ah! Ah!

Rob Allen
It’s actually quite complicated. Like, take the backbone out, and then like the drumsticks off, the wings off, and then you split the rest in half. And then…

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I don’t know where you’re looking at. I’m not even allowed to touch the knives.

Viv Yau
For safety reasons.

Rob Allen
That’s my next thing. So when we do chicken rice, we do a full chicken. We can do it like that.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah, I think this is the issue – like we will never kind of we don’t have the amount of time that Rob does to like do this research. That’s why I think you and like celestial peach, you and Jenny, you’re on the same vibe of just researching and getting these techniques distilled into what’s like, what’s the best or…

Charley Wong
Maybe Rob, what you need to do is come spend a day with Papa Wong because Papa Wong knows all this stuff. And also, he’s already watched all these YouTube videos!

Rob Allen
Something like that would be amazing.

Viv Yau
That’d be a dream, wouldn’t it?

Charley Wong
Let me set that for you, Rob.

Viv Yau
We’ll do a Little Yellow Rice Co/Papa Wong collaboration.

Rob Allen
I’ll have my phone out, just filming everything!

Charley Wong
The other day he asked me to go make a lo bak go with him, like to learn how to do it. And as soon as I arrived, I was like Dad I’m never gonna make this. I’m just here to spend time with you. But he still told me every single step painstakingly!

Viv Yau
Aw, you might make it in the future.

Charley Wong
I won’t. What am I gonna do with that much lo bak go?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Re-heat it.

Viv Yau
Give it to me!

Charley Wong
But it’s never gonna be as good as my dad’s, so what’s the point in trying? Oh. We have not got long left and it was something else.

Rob Allen
I really want to make wu gok, it’s like, Taro with mince in the middle.

Charley Wong
That’s the one you like, isn’t it, Viv?

Viv Yau
Ah, I love that. Again. Where did we have that? And that was amazing. It was Chef Dao I think as well.

Charley Wong
I’ve got high hopes for this Chef Dao on Sunday!

Viv Yau
It was so amazing. Like so soft inside and really crispy on the outside. Was it from there? Oh, no, yeah? No. Yeah, it was yeah, it was so good.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
It’s good for the non Manchester audience.

Charley Wong
Yeah, yeah. Sorry. Everyone who’s not from Manchester. Maybe you should come to Manchester. Yeah, exactly. This is what I hate, it’s like people think Manchester is so far away and then they come up from London. I was only two hours on the train. I’m like, ya know, I’ve been saying this for years!

Rob Allen
But I think that’s another thing that’s made it so sort of easy for us to be able to do our food business because of Manchester – the access, and the supermarkets available. At any point I can basically just get anything!

Viv Yau
Rob, I’ve seen you so many times in the Chinese Supermarket. I’m like – ‘There’s Rob!’

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
The Chinese Auntie in Hang Won Hong, she gives him freebies now at the counter.

Charley Wong
That is next level.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
You came home the other week with some special sweets she gave you and you didn’t even share it.

Charley Wong
Gave him a loyalty card.

Viv Yau
We’ve not got very long left, but there was something else we wanted to touch on. Obviously, we all also do something else in our spare time other than eat food. We all work in digital comms in some way or another. So Hannah I don’t know if you’ve kind of got any tips about those people looking to get into digital comms because obviously, you own agency. That’s the word I was looking for, thank you!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I’ve been in marketing for so long, because I’m so old now. That is true. I’ve been in marketing 17 years now. I think the one thing I would say like, for anybody ever looking to get into digital comms or has a business is the one thing we wax lyrical on is community, and find your community. Look to build a community, marketing isn’t about selling, it’s about building a base of people, and that works, whether you want to get into marketing, go and find people out there that are working in the area that you want to work in that you have a passion in. Don’t just plug into an agency, go and find the agency that fits what you want to do. Or the business. I worked in-house. I wasn’t even in an agency – I was in-house marketing for like 10 years. I think my favourite job was working in the lift industry, which doesn’t sound like exciting marketing, but they were great people, and I was allowed to like do whatever I wanted. Put on an exhibition at Excel set in lifts that had circus performers and my best mate doing an aerial hoop thing, with like a magical uppity box theme! And they just let me do whatever I want. Nobody wanted that gig in lift marketing, and I took it at 26. It was the best five years I ever did in marketing.

Viv Yau
Sounds like they really elevated you!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
They just let me do what I want.

Viv Yau
Did no one get the joke? Did no one get the joke? Jeez. I’m gonna stop now, I’m sorry!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Can we edit that out?

Charley Wong
Maybe it was the delivery of the joke. Maybe it wasn’t our fault.

Viv Yau
Sorry, I was interrupting.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
The best bit is that the company was called shorts lift. And I would always get the same gag because I’m only four foot 11 – ‘Oh, you’re the marketing manager and the mascot!’

Charley Wong
Oh, that is rude. You’re a short queen. So what we’ve got coming up then for both Little Yellow Rice Co and Consume Comms as well.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Well, we are doing a… we’ve been very good this year and have done business planning, so we’ve got a nice bit of synergy running between Consume Comms and Little Yellow Rice. Okay, so we’re doing our EC showcase at the moment, so we’re showcasing EC role models career pathways on Consume Comms, and creatives and makers. So I think your face will be popping up in the next couple weeks as well because we’re going to repost our IG TV. And we’re showcasing on Little Yellow Rice Co ESEA makers, very excited for tomorrow that we’ve got our film screening of Kung Fu Hustle, Steven Chow, which was a classic! And then we will have our ESEA marketplace – I’ll try not to buy all the stock myself because it’s gorgeous!

Charley Wong
Oh my gosh, I am so excited. I’m going to be buying so much!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah, I just can’t even get around all these earrings I’m gonna end up buying. And then we’ve got some private supper clubs, and we’re going back to Leeds next week to do a kitchen takeover ‘Eat Your Greens’, which is really good fun, it’s like 50 people, and I never thought we’d be doing an event that’s like 50 covers.

Rob Allen
It’ll be quite a lot of work.

Viv Yau
It’ll be quite a lot of work for you, Rob. It’ll be great for you, Hannah.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I bring the passion to it. That’s why I’m the project manager.

Rob Allen
It’ll be easier than last time!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
We’ve got a couple of like pop up food things coming, but then I’m also in the background working on some stuff too, like specifically Peranakan, so I’m going to do a Hokkien family tree that’s illustrated. So for people that are kind of forgetting how to be Hokkien, what you call your grandma and your second cousin and your third auntie and all of that. So we’ve got lots of like interesting things for you all planned out on a beautiful calendar now.

Charley Wong
Oh, that’s amazing. I love that. I’ll be buying.

Rob Allen
Maybe be in Malaysia at the end of the year!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Oh, yeah. And then hopefully we’re finally going back to Malaysia in November for my mother’s birthday. So we’ll be there for a whole month, and then from Malaysia flying to Hainan for the first time to go to our clan house.

Charley Wong
Oh, it’s so exciting.

Yeah. Okay, final question then. Before we wrap up the most important question of the podcast if you were to have I’ve just messed up the final question. Okay, what would your ideal three course meal be? And with a description of what it is if it’s not clear, please – goes to both of you.

Viv Yau
Just quick like don’t even think about it. Just whatever comes to mind.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
So mine is a mix of different cultures. So I would have Bruschetta starter, I would have my chicken rice. Hainanese chicken rice. And then for dessert, I would have pecan pie. That’s my favourite.

Viv Yau
Oh, very, a very broad mix there. Yeah, like that. I didn’t expect the pecan pie though.

Charley Wong
I didn’t expect the Bruschetta, that threw me a bit.

Rob Allen
I didn’t know you eat pecan pie.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I’ve been telling you to make me Gypsy tart for so long.

Viv Yau
What’s that? What’s gyspy tart?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
It’s like a classic Kent desert, it’s just treacle and condensed milk. Put into a cake tin and that is a very traditional Kentish food. That’s the other heritage food that I love!

Viv Yau
What would yours be Rob?

Rob Allen
For me, I think I’d like mussels in some way. One of my favourite things. And then I think it probably have to be Char keoy teow. That’s probably just like my favourite dish ever, like streetside, fried noodles. And then dessert. I’m not I’m not big on dessert. So yeah, I’d probably go for a cheeseboard.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
He says that but every time we go out you always have some kind of chocolate ganache.

Rob Allen
But that’s because that’s the option, like I would you know if there is any choice of cheese…

Viv Yau
Cheese board. Yeah, I agree with you on that. I do love desserts as well though. I just love everything to be honest.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Yeah, I mean, Rob loves Char keoy teow to the point that he was just wandering around Malaysia just like repeating like “Char keoy teow!”, and my family were like what’s he saying? What’s the matter with him? Oh, he just loves Char keoy teow.

Rob Allen
And then one guy did actually hear me like saying it and he thought that I wanted it. He was like, okay, yeah I’ll make it.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
No, he was just muttering it like a tick.

Rob Allen
He nearly started cooking it right – No, no, don’t like just!

Viv Yau
Oh, can you make some for us please? You only live around the corner from me.

Rob Allen
Last time we did it, it set the fire alarm off!

Viv Yau
I don’t care.

Charley Wong
I’m still waiting for my siew yuk you’ve promised me.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
He’s doing it today, actually.

Charley Wong
Oh, well how convenient that I’m seeing you tomorrow.

Viv Yau
I live around the corner from you, remember that!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I continuously offer to give you food parcels when you post that you’ve got no food or toilet roll.

Rob Allen
We’re still waiting to do a like a big Dim Sum restock. Like one day of making loads and loads of dim sum and then just fill the freezer.

Viv Yau
Can I help you make some?

Rob Allen
I did promise like Charley a while back.

Viv Yau
Wait no, I just want to eat actually. I don’t want to help make it, I take that back. I just want to eat it.

Charley Wong
You did and I’m still waiting.

Rob Allen
We’re doing it soon when we’ve got a bit of time.

Viv Yau
Just do it now, Rob.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
I mean yeah, he’s not working for Consume Comms right now. So I don’t even know what you’re doing.

Viv Yau
We don’t care. Do it. Well, thank you so much for joining us. We were joined by the two co founders of Little Yellow Rice Co Hannah Natalie Hosanee and Rob Robert Allen. You can find them on Instagram at Little Yellow Rice Co or you can follow them both on Instagram – Hannah Natalie underscore Oh as in O-H, or Rob with two Bs 1984

Charley Wong
Giving away your age, there.

Rob Allen
It’s a good sounding year though, isn’t it? 1984.

Viv Yau

1984. George Orwell.

Rob Allen
Yeah. Books, and in loads of song lyrics.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Mine’s Hannah Oh because it’s Ooi-Hosanee.

Rob Allen
Just sounds good as well. 1984!

Viv Yau
Wait, Hannah, why is yours Oh?

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Ooi. It’s my mum says that, Little Yellow Rice Co, And then Hosanee.

Viv Yau
Ah, I see. I just thought it was like, ‘oh’

Rob Allen
I’ve only just learned that now!

Viv Yau
Well, thank you to you both for joining today. It was really nice having you on the podcast.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Is that my accent?

Viv Yau
I’m trying to do your kind of like Kent accent.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
You sound like an Australian.

Viv Yau
Well, well, that’s rude. But okay. Thank you for coming on. Um, it’s been a pleasure. And we’ll see you on Sunday for some dim sum for Lunar New Year!

Charley Wong
Will you not see them tomorrow?

Viv Yau
I’ll see you tomorrow at Grub Manchester when you’re doing your EC makers event. It’s gonna be loads of fun. I’m gonna eat loads of doughnuts.

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Lovely. Well, thanks for having us on, and next time we’ll come on a separate podcast for Punk and Flump. They send their regards.

Viv Yau
We need to, everyone needs to follow both of your accounts because they have really cute rabbits who are super, super fluffy and cute.

Charley Wong
Thanks, guys.

Rob Allen
Thank you!

Hannah Natalie Hosanee
Bye!